Fraud Alerts

June 30, 2016 – Emergency Phone Scam – iTunes Gift Cards

Kindred would like to make members aware of a telephone scam that a number of Canadians have fallen victim to. The type of scam is often referred to as the ‘emergency or grandparent’ scam. The fraudster will impersonate a family member over the phone, and claim to have a legal or medical emergency which urgently requires money. The caller will then give instructions to the victim on how to make a payment quickly, and privately, for example by purchasing and providing iTunes cards. The scammer’s goal is to take advantage of the sense of panic and the emotions of the victim.

Police warn the public to be vigilant and use increased judgment. Scams which involve paying urgent medical bills or helping a loved one out of jail have been around for a while. New “cyber-blackmail” cases, or requests for iTunes cards and gift cards as payment, are a more sophisticated trick used by fraudsters and organized criminals. The scammers can then resell the security codes on the back of the gift cards.

  • Never give out personal or financial information as a result of unsolicited telephone calls. Only provide personal information or send funds if you have initiated the transaction with a source you know is legitimate.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions and if you feel pressured or threatened, never hesitate to end calls.
  • Record unsolicited caller’s information and scam details, and report to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

Kindred continues to caution our staff and members to be wary of this type of ‘emergency or grandparent’ scam.  For more information visit our Anti-fraud page or contact your local branch.


June 28, 2016 – CRA Refund Email Scam

Kindred has become aware of a scam using illegitimate email notifications that appear to be from CRA.  These email messages suggest that the individual receiving the email is entitled to a CRA refund. The message continues by requesting credit card information to apply any refunds or credits.  CRA wants Canadians to be aware that CRA agents will never request a credit card via email to apply any refunds or credits.
 
CRA is also reminding Canadians that they will not:

  • request personal information by email
  • email you a link requesting you fill in an online form with personal or financial details
  • send you a link to your refund by email or text message

If you suspect that you have received one of these emails, exercise caution. Do not give out personal or financial information and do not click on the links provided in the email.  Contact your local branch immediately.
 
For more information visit the CRA website, the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre and our Anti-fraud page.

 


March 15, 2016 – CUETS Financial Telephone Scam

 

Kindred has become aware of a phone scam occurring where an individual is fraudulently impersonating a CUETS representative.
 
A member received a telephone call from an individual purporting to be a CUETS Financial Credit Bureau representative. The individual asked the member to confirm their DOB and SIN and left the following call back telephone number: 1-866-204-7603. CUETS Financial has been contacted and has confirmed this is indeed a scam. CUETS advised they do not contact members and request confirmation of DOB and/or SIN.
 
Please remember:

  • Never give out personal or financial information over the phone
  • Reputable Financial Institutions or credit card companies will never ask members to verify personal, financial or card information when they initiate contact
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions and if you feel pressured, never hesitate to end call or delete an email
  • You can confirm a call’s legitimacy by contacting the company through telephone numbers that they advertise publicly.

If you receive a call requesting this information, please call your local branch immediately. For more information on types of scams, visit our Anti-Fraud page or the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre website.
 
Recognize It! Report It! Stop It!

 


 

February 12, 2016 – Prize Pitch Scam

Kindred has become aware of a prize pitch scam that occurred through Facebook.  Individual A received what appeared to be a friend request from an existing Facebook friend (Individual B) and accepted that request.  Shortly after, Individual A received a message from Individual B saying they had received $150,000.  Individual A was offered a share of the winnings if he accepted a friend request from Individual C who was a contact of his ‘supposed existing friend’ (Individual B).  This friend request was accepted from Individual C, based on what appeared to be Individual B’s recommendation and Individuals A and C began communicating about how Individual A’s share of the winnings could be collected.
 
Individual A was asked to share personal information, including account numbers and online banking access information.  Individual C (the fraudster) told Individual A that once all his information was received and  $700 USD was sent via Western Union or Money Gram to cover shipping costs, his share of the winnings would be sent.
 
If you receive this type of request, it is a scam. Please do not to disclose any personal information on Facebook or over the Internet. Contact your local branch immediately.
 
For more information on prize pitch scams or types of fraud visit our Anti-Fraud page or the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre website.


February 4, 2016 – Reader's Digest scam

 

Kindred has become aware of a Reader’s Digest scam currently taking place.  In late January a Kindred member received an official looking letter indicating they were the lucky winner of a very large Reader’s Digest ‘super cash lotto’ prize.  The letter urgently encouraged our member to contact a claim agent to collect their prize.  To claim their prize our member was instructed to first deposit two cheques totalling several thousand dollars to their account and subsequently withdraw thousands of dollars in cash and in turn send the cash via Canada Post to a name and address provided by the claim agent. Once these steps were completed our member was supposed to be able to claim their prize.  Fortunately in this case Kindred helped our member see that this was not a legitimate lottery and assisted in foiling the scam midstream.  Kindred continues to caution our staff and members to be wary of this type of ‘prize pitch or lottery’ scam.  In a legitimate lottery or contest the winner will not be asked to send cash as a requirement for receiving their winnings!

For more information on this type of scam, contact your local branch or visit our Anti-Fraud page.


January 25, 2016 – Telephone number spoofing

 

Kindred has become aware of a telephone number spoofing incident.  Telephone number spoofing happens when a phone number is programmed to appear on call display as different  than the originator’s number.  In this case, the legitimate number for a financial institution was being used to appear to be that financial institution (FI), when in fact it was not that FI calling.

Kindred is alerting members about these types of calls.  While they may look legitimate, exercise caution in responding.  Many times these calls will occur outside of normal business hours. 
Remember:

  • Never give out personal or financial information over the phone
  • Reputable FIs or credit card companies will never ask members to verify personal, financial or card information
  • You can confirm a call’s legitimacy by contacting the company through telephone numbers that they advertise publicly.

If you are unsure about the nature of a call, hang up and contact your local branch immediately. 

For more information on phone spoofing and other types of phishing scams visit Kindred’s Anti-Fraud page or the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre website.


November 10, 2015 - Fraudulent CRA Phone Calls
 
Kindred has become aware of fraudulent phone calls claiming to be from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) circulating throughout Canada.  The caller may falsely indicate that they are an agent or police officer working on behalf of the CRA.  They may request personal information from you or tell you that you are required to pay an outstanding debt immediately.  The caller may even give instructions on how to make payment on this fictitious debt.  These calls could include threatening language used to try to intimidate you into taking action.

CRA warns Canadians to be vigilant when they receive communication (telephone, text or email) from someone who claims to be from the CRA.  If you should receive a call saying you owe money to the CRA, you may phone the CRA directly using a phone number found through a public source or by checking your account through the My Account section on the CRA public website.
 
For more information, contact your local branch or visit our Anti-Fraud page.

 

 


 

April 13, 2015 - Fraudulent CRA e-Transfer Emails
 
Kindred has become aware of fraudulent e-Transfer email notifications that appear to be from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) circulating throughout Canada. The email may appear similar to the example below.
 
If you receive an Interac e-Transfer notification from CRA, these emails are fraudulent; do not open the email. However, if you have opened an email like this, do not click on any of the links contained in it.
 
The CRA only sends payments by direct deposit or cheque, never by email money transfer. Furthermore, the CRA’s website indicates the following:

  • The CRA will not request personal information of any kind from a taxpayer by email;
  • The CRA will not divulge taxpayer information to another person unless formal authorization is provided by the taxpayer;
  • The CRA will not leave any personal information on an answering machine.
For more information, contact your local branch or visit our Anti-Fraud page.
 

From: notify@payments.interac.ca
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 5:23 PM
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: INTERAC e-Transfer from Canada Revenue Agency System

 
Dear customer,
 
Canada Revenue Agency has sent you an INTERAC e-Transfer (previously INTERAC Email Money Transfer).
 
Amount: $120.00 (CAD)
 
Sender's Message: A message was not provided
 
Expiry Date: 25 June 2012
Action Required:
To deposit your money, click here:
(fraudulent web link)
 
Trouble with the link? Type it into your web browser address bar.
Need help?
(fraudulent web link)

 


 

June 23, 2014 - Fraudulent Security Issue Emails
Credit union members from across Canada have recently reported receiving an email appearing to be from their credit union announcing a new internet security issue. This email contains a link asking the recipient to verify their online account information. If you receive an email like this, do not click on the link and delete it immediately. Reputable financial institutions will never send you emails or other forms of communication asking you to verify or provide your online banking details. To learn more about staying safe on the Internet, visit our Security page.

 

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